Five minutes with…Adrian Tamburini, bass

One of the bass soloists singing with us at the premiere of ‘An Australian War Requiem’ on 10 August 2014, Adrian Tamburini answers questions about the significance of the event for him.

What did you find tempting about the invitation to sing in An Australian War Requiem?
I’m a strong believer and supporter of new Australian music. In my career I’ve been lucky enough to sing works by Australian composers such as Stuart Greenbaum, Johanna Selleck and Brett Dean. So when I was told that there was a part in this work I jumped at the chance and accepted.

Australian soldier George Griffin, D Company, 53rd Battalion, A.I.F. reading State Library of New South Wales [Public domain or CC-BY-SA-3.0-au]

Australian soldier George Griffin, D Company, 53rd Battalion, A.I.F. reading
State Library of New South Wales [Public domain or CC-BY-SA-3.0-au]

Do you have a personal connection to the Great War (ie, did any of your family serve?)
I do not have a connection to WW1. But nonetheless, I am grateful to the men who fought for Australia, and the women who supported them at home, to give all following generations in Australia the privilege of living in freedom, peace and prosperity.

What is the most poignant (and enduring) image evoked for you by the text?
My main solo is based on the text of a letter written by a soldier who witnessed first-hand the devastation war has on the bodies of the soldiers. Never, in my life could I imagine the atrocities forced upon these men’s bodies by war and weaponry.

What are you looking forward to most about the premiere on August 10?
It is always a great honour to be a part of a world premiere performance and to be able to share it with the composer, the librettist and a team of fine and enthusiastic performers.

What is on the horizon for you now?
I’m lucky to be a handful of full-time working opera singers working in Australia. I will continue to work with Opera Australia throughout 2015 on some very exciting projects.

 

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